About Different Roads to Learning

Our Difflearn blog was created specifically for sharing. Here, we’ll collaborate with trusted professionals and parents to share experiences, concerns, new and exciting products and events and best of all, our collective treasure of information. It is our hope that you will find the information posted here helpful, practical, and interesting and that it will help all of us – especially our children – learn and grow. And this is just the beginning…We hope that professionals and parents who have advice, information or a story to share will contact us and submit thoughts and ideas for blog posts. We intend for this to be a true community and all who are interested in the education of our ASD children are invited to participate.

Seaver Autism & YAI Family Peer Advocate Study

The Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine is conducting a research study that uses Family Peer Advocates to help improve the health and well-being of children with autism. YAI and Premier HealthCare have also partnered up with the research center to provide participants in the study a comprehensive diagnostic assessment. YAI provides one of the nation’s most comprehensive networks of programs and services to assist people with disabilities in maximizing their potential.

 

Family Peer Advocates of this initiative will provide peer support and education related to autism, act as liaisons between families and health care providers, as well as assist families in navigating a complex system of services. Eligible participants include parents of children who have been diagnosed with autism, individuals of African-American or Latino descent, and those who reside in the Bronx or Manhattan. Participation is entirely voluntary and free. Eligible participants will be asked to completed a series of questionnaires over the course of six months, and also reimbursed for travel expenses.

The Seaver Autism Center leads progressive research studies while providing comprehensive, personalized care to children and adults with autism spectrum conditions. For more information about the YAI Family Peer Advocate Study, visit the Seaver Autism Center’s Current Studies or call (212) 241-0961.

Horse Program helps both Children and Adults with Disabilities

A new therapy program called Hoof Prints in the Sand services individuals with special needs ranging from ages 5 to 63. This animal based therapy program is aimed at using interactions with horses to help individuals gain not only physical skills like muscle definition, correct posture and hand-eye coordination but also much-needed confidence.

Founded by a special education teacher with an equestrian background the entire Hoof Prints in the Sand  program consists of volunteers who dedicate their time to work one on one with students of varying disabilities and ages. Students begin by testing out a mechanical horse appropriately named “Hope” and then easing into riding lessons on donated horses.  The volunteer coaches help students by riding with them, leading the horses, or walking beside the horse and rider to ensure safety.

Do you know of a unique program for individuals with special needs in your area?

Special Needs Summer Camps

Summer time can be full of excitement for children. Time away from school, vacationing, family events, and of course, summer camp!

For parents of children with special needs it can be a challenge finding a local camp that is able to support yours child’s specific needs. There are a variety of options available for campers with special needs ranging from day camps to overnight camps.  Some programs are need specific while others camps are able to offer a more inclusive setting.

Summer camps can be beneficial for children in various ways. Camps offer environments where children can learn social skills, verbal skills, work on everyday independent tasks, learn new hobbies such as biking, swimming, art, musical instruments and more. While at camp children make important bonds and connections with camp staff as well as other campers. All of these activities and new bonds help campers gain independence, build confidence and raise self-esteem.

Summers camps aren’t only beneficial to the children participating in them. Camps are also a great opportunity for parents to meet, greet and network with each other to share resource information.

To help find a summer camp that meets your child’s special needs try this site:

Special Needs Summer Camps

Interested in reading about some unique summer camps? Check out these additional sites

Social Skills Camp

Bicycle Camp for Speical Needs

Goulds Camp

Know of a great summer camp?  Let us and other parents know!

New monitoring system gives adults with disabilities a new look at independent living

 With all the new advances in technology some adults with disabilities are finding new ways to put them to use enabling them to gain independence and   begin living on their own. A new article details life outside of assisted living and group homes to a new 24-hour monitored independent-living housing situation. A new system called Sengistics is able to monitor programmed activities of a household 24 hours a day. For example things like doors and windows opening after specifically programmed hours can trigger a phone call to a caretaker allowing the caretaker to check-in with the individual moments later. Other features that can be programmed include motion sensors for areas of the house alerting caretakers of possible injuries and accidents, alert systems for appliances to make sure they are secured properly after use, alerts for medications ensuring they are taken on the correct schedule as well as a variety of other individualized monitors that can be programmed to call and notify different contacts.

This type of living situation is ideal for those who cannot live in a fully independent housing situation but who are generally over-served in assisted living homes. It also fosters the use of previously learned living skills as well as helps by giving the individual the opportunity to acquire new sets of skills ranging from simple chores to shopping lists, money management and more. Lastly, for parents with adult children who continually need support and are unable to live fully independent lives this new type of housing situations enables them to gain a piece of mind about the future.

To learn more about the monitoring system and its features click on the following article:

High-Tech Monitoring

Elephant Therapy

Elephant therapy in Thailand

https://www.theautismnews.com/2011/05/12/elephant-therapy-in-thailand/

We’re all familiar with the practice of animal therapy for individuals with a range of disabilities from common household animals like dogs and cats to equine therapy, the newest animal to be include in the mix? Elephants!

An organization in northernThailandrecently introduced a new kind of therapy for their autistic population, elephant therapy, and so far they have found participates responding positively. Elephants, familiar to participants through their cultural importance, provide a range of potential benefits through their interactions with the population being served. Staff running this new-found therapy say tasks included during sessions range from grooming the elephants, shopping for care items such as bananas, sugar cane, etc. for the participating elephants using real funds, playing games, and art-related activities. All of these activities revolve around teaching a variety of specific skills including flexibility, tolerance, creativity, and socialization through group play.

Currently, the program is new and limited to only a few sessions due to funding but hopefully we will see more unique programs being created like these to serve the autistic population!

Posted in ABA

Implementing the Intervention…Even When Things are Going Well

Recently I was working with a parent who was using a TimeTimer with her son to help him recognize when it was time to get ready for bed. Our plan was to start the timer every night while he was engaged in an activity, show him the timer and have him repeat how many minutes left, then have him tell his mom when the timer went off. For the first couple of weeks, this plan worked beautifully. The boy could see the time elapsing, brought the timer to his mother when it went off, and then started the process to get ready for bed without engaging in tantrum behaviors.

I went in for a parent training session after a month of the intervention and the boy’s mother informed me the timer just wasn’t working any more. As we started talking, I realized that the mother had drifted from our original plan in a way that is quite common. As her son experienced success, she used the timer less frequently. Then, if he was struggling, she would introduce the timer. In effect, she started only using the timer when he was misbehaving, instead of using it as a consistent tool to help him with the bedtime routine.

This type of procedural drift (when there is an unintentional or unplanned change in the procedure outlined for the intervention) is very common for parents, teachers, and ABA therapists. It’s important to understand this type of drift so it can be corrected when it occurs.

Here are a few things to remember when implementing an intervention:

• First, any intervention should include a clear plan for fading the intervention. In the example above, the TimeTimer was an appropriate tool for this particular child, who was only four years old. But we don’t want him to rely on the timer for the duration of childhood! A plan should include how to fade the intervention with specific steps and specific requirements for mastery.

• The use of the TimeTimer is considered an antecedent intervention. This means that we are implementing a change in the environment prior to any problem behaviors to help the child contact reinforcement and experience success. Antecedent interventions should be implemented consistently as part of a routine, not ONLY when a problem behavior occurs. If it is only implemented when the problem behavior occurs, it is no longer an antecedent intervention.

• If we implement a tool (like the TimeTimer) only when problem behavior occurs, it’s possible the tool will become aversive to the child and possibly result in an increased magnitude of the problem behavior.

• Consider using tools for the people implementing to intervention to remind them of the specific steps. For example, you might create a video model and instruct the parent (or other adult implementing the intervention) to watch it every couple days. Or you might post the steps in a clear space to be reviewed regularly.

• Finally, we have to remember that a couple of good days in a row without any instances of problem behavior does not mean that the problem is solved. This is why the first step outlined above is so important. We want to teach the child replacement behaviors and give them lots of opportunities to be successful with it.

 

Ultimately, we were able to re-implement the procedure with this parent and see more continued success with this particular case. We also decided to post the steps to the intervention on the back of the TimeTimer for easy review on a daily basis.

However, in some cases, you might have to create an entirely new intervention using different tools. The goal is to be clear about the steps of the intervention, and to maintain those steps when implementing the intervention.


WRITTEN BY SAM BLANCO, PhD, LBA, BCBA

Sam is an ABA provider for students ages 3-15 in NYC. Working in education for twelve years with students with Autism Spectrum Disorders and other developmental delays, Sam utilizes strategies for achieving a multitude of academic, behavior, and social goals. She is also an assistant professor in the ABA program at The Sage Colleges.

How Parents Can Fit ABA Into Their Busy Schedules

“Dear Behavior BFF, I have followed your posts for a while now. The problem I see is that in order for me to be successful as a parent, I have to follow ABA 100% of the time. In order to be effective, do I need to enroll in graduate classes and learn everything I can about ABA? Do I need to become a BCBA to manage my own kids’ behavior better? Feeling overwhelmed over here…”

Thank you for learning about ABA as a parent. The science of behavior can help us SO much with our own kids. But does that mean you need to know every technical definition and fact before you can use some behavior strategies in your own home? NO! Heck no!

You are a busy parent. I am a busy parent. Most people reading this are busy parents (at least that’s the intended audience).  Do you have time to complete a master’s degree in behavior analysis just to help you be a more efficient parent who capitalizes on the science of behavior? Ummm…no. You don’t have that kind of time. So does that mean you should give up on using behavior analysis as a parent? Also no.

Behavior analysis teaches us to focus on the behavior itself. It teaches us to manipulate the environment to help our kids engage in desired and proactive behaviors. It helps us find ways to increase positive reinforcement, increase positive interactions, and teach our kids to effectively communicate their wants and needs.

The good news is we can do all of those things within the constraints of our busy family schedules! You can use positive reinforcement effectively without knowing the difference between differential reinforcement of incompatible or alternative behaviors.

And more good news: when you need to get technical, there are Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) to do that with you! We like talking behavior science. We are ABA nerds. Let us do that part for you. If you want to join us, then enroll in that ABA graduate program. If you don’t want a new career- then learn what you can as a parent in the time that you have.

So where do you start in order to not be overwhelmed and get the benefit of decades of behavioral research? You’re in the right place. Peruse these non-academic articles offered at bSci21 that help make the science easier to digest. Learn about positive reinforcement and how to use it effectively.

Start by providing positive reinforcement for desired behaviors. Decide what you want your child to do more of, then reward them for doing it! Start small with one behavior strategy at a time, then continue to learn and add another positive behavior support as you go.

You don’t have to become a behavior expert in order to effectively use behavior analysis to save your sanity as a parent. Start small, build a little at a time. Celebrate your successes. Reward your child(ren) for their successes. Shape your own behavior by building on with baby steps. Every step in the right direction is a success. Make it work for you and your family in the time that you have. You CAN do this!


About The Author 

Leanne Page, MEd, BCBA, is the author of Parenting with Science: Behavior Analysis Saves Mom’s Sanity. As a Behavior Analyst and a mom of two little girls, she wanted to share behavior analysis with a population who could really use it- parents!

Leanne’s writing can be found in Parenting with Science and Parenting with ABA as well as a few other sites. She is a monthly contributor to bSci21.com , guest host for the Dr. Kim Live show, and has contributed to other websites as well.

Leanne has worked with children with disabilities for over 10 years. She earned both her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Texas A&M University.  She also completed ABA coursework through the University of North Texas before earning her BCBA certification in 2011. Leanne has worked as a special educator of both elementary and high school self-contained, inclusion, general education, and resource settings.

Leanne also has managed a center providing ABA services to children in 1:1 and small group settings. She has  extensive experience in school and teacher training, therapist training, parent training, and providing direct services to children and families in a center-based or in-home therapy setting.

Leanne is now located in Dallas, Texas and is available for: distance BCBA and BCaBA supervision, parent training, speaking opportunities, and consultation. She can be reached via Facebook or at Lpagebcba@gmail.com.